GARANTITO IGP: Mr. Dottori Certainly Didn’t Do It Because of Doctors’ Orders

Cupramontana

Cupramontana

This time Stefano Tesi takes the stand.

My father used to say that everybody, at some point, decides to pen a tome, a collection of thoughts, reasoning, confessions and reflections. And that some succeed.

Corrado Dottori, winemaker from Cupramontana – the Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi area – did it.

And his book, once published, did cause a stir among those who work in or follow the wine world. So much that the opus (“Non è il vino dell’enologo – Lessico di un vignaiolo che dissente”, Derive Approdi Editore, 136 pages, 13 Euros) has already been reprinted.

I’ll start out by saying I know the author personally, and very much like his wines, because of their depth, and I have also been to the winery.

This said, Mr. Dottori and I differ in many ways. Age, profession, ideas, and experiences, or at least some of them.

Yes, because it was a surprise (more mine than his, I think) to discover that we have many experiences in common. In particular the life choice, made with much thought and an awareness of the difficulties involved, to return, knowledgeably, to the country as it truly is, cold houses, wild lands, and a feeling of isolation. And of the women who back you up, so completely that you feel guilty about the difficulties that they face by your side.

Corrado Dottori

Corrado Dottori

And it is this collage of recriminations, occasional regrets, and criticisms (not all original; I must admit) with regards to the wine “system” and western society that one finds in the book, deftly presented and enjoyable to read, coupled with considerations that jump from one extreme to the other on contemporary life, at the heart of which – intentionally – Dottori sets his farm, his problems, and his daily life. A sort of ping pong or interplay of mirrors between himself and the rest of the world.

All from a standpoint that, he says, is that of a dissenter. Sometimes quite dissenting. But able – and this is a plus – to never present himself as an antagonist, but rather at times take the position of a disenchanted sage (what would have at one tme been called “critical conscience”) with regards to a world that, as much in wine as in general society, is not what it seems, and often simply conforms to anticonformity.

In summary, despite what one might think, this “Non è il vino dell’enologo”, which revolves around the wine world, is not just for wine lovers. It is, rather, a generational work, a confession, aimed at certain escapees – from the cities, from finance, from marketing, and to a lesser degree from the temptations of the fetishist arguings that come, at a certain point in life,when one asks if one prefers utopia in and of itself, or the warm hues of its sunset.

It’s a book one can bet that many will identify with. And that makes one want to taste wine.

For sale here, via the web.

The book, not the wine!

Published Simultaneously by IGP, I Giovani Promettenti.Garantito IGP

We Are:

Carlo Macchi
Kyle Phillips
Luciano Pignataro
Roberto Giuliani
Stefano Tesi

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About Cosa Bolle in Pentola

Italy boasts an astonishing number of varietals, denominations, and wines, and tremendous changes are sweeping the land. New wines are being created, new DOCs are being introduced, and the existing denominations are overhauling their regulations both to reflect the practices adopted by their member wineries and to favor improvements in quality. Even the most staid and stolid region can flower seemingly overnight, emerging with exciting new wines and wineries that require rewriting the enological maps and rethinking one's positions. And, of course, recipes too, because cuisine and wine are closely intertwined and it's difficult to imagine one without the other.
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